The is a new bathroom I built from the remains of an old toilet/sink half bath and an adjoining closet that I incorporated into the new bathroom in order to allow room for a shower. Everything was stripped down to the framing, all the new wiring and plumbing and sound proof insulation was added, the very small window was replaced with a large fully opening casement window, then I covered the entire space, floor, walls and ceiling with cement board. Cement board is the most durable of the tiling substrates, but others are also very effective and long lasting. Because of the small size of the bathroom, and the shower, I knew that whole space would fill up with steam on a regular basis, so I mortared a waterproof membrane over the entire surface of the cement board, just as one would do when constructing a steam room. Then I set the tiles over the membrane. This is a nice design because it prevents the cement substrate, and the mortar base of the shower, from absorbing water, which does a lot to prevent mold growth. My client chose hand pressed gas fired tiles; the minor variations in color and surface of these tiles create a gently mottled overall effect that you I don’t think you can really see in these photographs. The pattern on the shower wall was designed by my client on her dining room floor, I then labeled the backs of each tile, brought them into the bathroom and recreated her pattern on the wall. The new bathroom fan is on a push-button timer, and so is the new electric heater I installed. These type of point of use controllers are efficient (you don’t need to worry about leaving them on, because they will by default automatically turn off in five, ten, twenty or thirty minutes). The small halogen lights mounted in the ceiling are on a dimmer switch so that the bathroom may be brightly lit for cleaning, or left on a more subdued level for daily usage.
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